Will “Clinton Cash” Consume Hillary’s Campaign?

Bloomberg Politics’ John Heilemann weighs in on the publishing strategy for Pete Schweizer’s “Clinton Cash” and the Hillary Clinton operation’s reaction to the controversy.

Ben Carson’s New Book Just Outsold Hillary Clinton’s

by Dave Weigel, Slate

…Carson’s One Nation has sold 224,990 copies, a massive success for his publisher, Random House. (The book came out under the conservative Sentinel imprint.) Clinton’s Hard Choices has sold 222,822 copies. The two of them have been bested only by Bill O’Reilly, whose Killing Jesus has sold 228,811 copies. They are joined in the blockbuster circle by Michael Lewis (189,726 copies of Flash Boys), Charles Krauthammer (177,121 copies of his column collection) and Thomas Piketty (158,668 copies of Capital). Carson’s book is substantially shorter than Clinton’s, and retails for $9.05 less, but he gets bragging rights if he decides to jump into politics…

How Liberalism Became Kryptonite for Superman: A graphic tale of modern comic books’ descent into moral relativism.

In the 900th issue of Action Comics, Superman decides to go before the United Nations and renounce his U.S. citizenship. ” ‘Truth, justice and the American way’—it’s not enough any more,” he despairs. That issue, published in April 2011, is perhaps the most dramatic example of modern comics’ descent into political correctness, moral ambiguity and leftist ideology.

We are comic-book artists and comics are our passion. But more important they’ve inspired and shaped many millions of young Americans.

Read more in The Wall Street Journal

The Hayek Prize: In Praise of Prices

OF ALL the great crimes that societies have managed to perpetrate against themselves, the suppression of prices receives scarce attention. But not for lack of trying on the part of Friedrich Hayek, the great Austrian economist. In his most popular work, The Road to Serfdom, he wrote:

Any attempt to control prices or quantities of particular commodities deprives competition of its power of bringing about an effective co-ordination of individual efforts, because price changes then cease to register all the relevant changes in circumstances and no longer provide a reliable guide for the individual’s actions.


Reading Hayek in Beijing

A chronicler of Mao’s depredations finds much to worry about in modern China.

An Interview with Yang Jisheng, by Bret Stephens

In the spring of 1959, Yang Jisheng, then an 18-year-old scholarship student at a boarding school in China’s Hubei Province, got an unexpected visit from a childhood friend. “Your father is starving to death!” the friend told him. “Hurry back, and take some rice if you can.”

Granted leave from his school, Mr. Yang rushed to his family farm. “The elm tree in front of our house had been reduced to a barkless trunk,” he recalled, “and even its roots had been dug up.” Entering his home, he found his father “half-reclined on his bed, his eyes sunken and lifeless, his face gaunt, the skin creased and flaccid . . . I was shocked with the realization that the term skin and bones referred to something so horrible and cruel.”

Mr. Yang’s father would die within three days. Yet it would take years before Mr. Yang learned that what happened to his father was not an isolated incident. He was one of the 36 million Chinese who succumbed to famine between 1958 and 1962.


Neurosurgeon’s Speeches Have Conservatives Dreaming of 2016

By Trip Gabriel

BALTIMORE — Dr. Benjamin Carson was a political unknown just weeks ago.

Then with a single speech delivered as President Obama looked stonily on, he was lofted into the conservative firmament as its newest star: a renowned neurosurgeon who is black and has the credibility to attack the president on health care.

In his speech at the National Prayer Breakfast last month, Dr. Carson criticized the health care overhaul and higher taxes on the rich, while warning that “the P.C. police are out in force at all times.”

Overnight, he was embraced by conservatives including those at The Wall Street Journal editorial page, which proclaimed, “Ben Carson for President” — a suggestion Dr. Carson helped feed at a high-profile gathering last weekend, the Conservative Political Action Conference. He was interrupted by sustained cheers when he coyly said, “Let’s just say if you magically put me in the White House…”